Why Move to Newfoundland

Why Live In Newfoundland?

 

For anyone interested in all the best that life has to offer, they should consider retiring in Newfoundland.  This is quickly becoming one of the most popular provinces in Canada, owing to all of the different opportunities, both recreational and financial, people can find here.  The region is steeped in history, think Marconi’s first transatlantic transmission, which will make it an appealing choice for people everywhere.  But the region is quickly modernizing as well, offering some of the best all around schools and employment opportunities.  It may be helpful to get a breakdown of some of the different types of experiences that people can expect to get when they arrive here.

 

Any overview of this province will have to start with a picture of St. John's.  This is widely regarded as the oldest city in North America, since this is where colonization of the area began.  It is also the most Easterly point, in North America, Cape Spear.  The city has grown up around a natural harbor area that borders the Atlantic Ocean.  Ships have actually been entering this port for over 500 years now, which has influenced the local culture considerably.  Not thinking about moving here you may want to come for a visit, and let us change your mind, The Newfoundland Government has done an amazing job marketing our great province and have still really just scratched the surface check. See what you can do here.   

 

New residents will be impressed by the community spirit that they find on the island.  It is well known for the George Street festival that is held on an annual basis.  This tends to draw in people from not just this province but from all over the world. It has been said that George Street said rivals Bourbon Street. It is a small road in the core of the City’s Downtown, known for its live music and its bars and restaurants.  But every year, the pub owners will go out of their way to help the town celebrate its heritage.  Anyone interested will want to show up the last weekend in July, when the festival is at a peak.

 

The George Street festival is also considered a primer for the Royal St. John’s Regatta that is held in St. John's the first wed of August every year, unless it’s the next day.  It is the only weather dependant Municipal Holiday in Canada, Ask a local about Regatta Roulette. It is thought that this festival has been held on an annual basis since 1816, making it one of the longest continually operating of its kind.  The event showcases 6 person Fixed seat rowing races put on by local residents. Consider 1 of 2 bucket list events for local and non local athletes, the other being The Tely 10 these rowing events have long been associated with the Regatta.  This Regatta has even drawn in visits from the royal family, including a stop off by Elizabeth II in 1978.

 

Given all that there is to do in St. John’s it may be easy to overlook, other areas of the province; Don’t miss out on Events such as the Brigus Blueberry Festival, Salmon Festival, Holyrood Festival, and so many more. I have no doubt that after you have spent a week or a month here some of you will be interested in purchasing local real estate.

There are a wide variety of different homes available throughout the island.  New residents may want to check out the downtown area of St. John's, as well as the region near the harbor.  Where else in North America can you get an acre of land with ocean frontage within a 40 minute drive of a major city for a reasonable price. There are many excellent properties that have an ocean view in the area.  As a local Remax agent, I am always ready to help potential buyers find the perfect home.  First time home buyers and retiring residents may want to check out some of the local neighborhoods in the area.  They may be particularly interested in searching through homes in Paradise, Mount Pearl, Torbay and the Logy Bay-Middle Cove-Outer Cove areas.  Looking for something a little quieter you need only go 30 minutes outside the city.
Published 14 February 14 01:03 by Gene Lye

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